237.130 Week 3: Task 3: Daft #3

Close examination and critical evaluation of visual text are extremely important tools for enhancing art and design practices. If an artist can not think critically about someone else’s work then they will struggle to offer in-depth meaning within their own art and design practice. Critical thinking involves being able to consider, understand and respond accordingly to several different aspects of thinking. These aspects include creative thinking, analyzing, problem-solving, reasoning and evaluating (Wallace, Schirato, Bright, Page: 46).

In reading ‘How To See The World’ by Nicholas Mirzoeff , the author offers great insight into our generation and the disregard we have for the natural world that surrounds us. “Aki Hoshide took his own picture in space. Ignoring the spectacle of Earth, space and moon.” (Mirzoeff, Page:8) Mirzoeff compares this visual text to the photograph known as Blue Marble taken in 1972. Blue Marble contains only the Earth and Hoshide’s image contains only himself with a slight reflection of the world and space around him due to his reflective space helmet. Hoshide’s actions speak magnitudes about the time that we live in. The fact that the astronaut turned the camera on himself whilst being faced with one of the most astonishing sights experienceable tells us a lot our generation’s values. We live in a world where the ‘selfie’ is everything. Understanding contrast between the two images and two moments in time helped me to gather a more complex understanding of how context can immensely affect the outcome of art and design processes.

I experienced similar contrast paired with immense irony whilst visiting Wellington Zoo’s tiger enclosure. I walked towards the glass and metal gated compound which was about the size of a tennis court and home to three tigers. I entered a wooden viewing area which provided the public with a place to stand and view the enclosure. This was accompanied by a TV screen showing tigers in their natural habitat. The tigers in the cage were fast asleep and only just visible. They were not moving. The tigers on the TV screens were jumping around playing with each other and making noises, they looked lively and happy. I found the contrast between the tigers on the TV screen and the tigers in the enclosures extremely ironic. The TV screen showed boundless movement and freedom and the enclosure in front of me offered no movement what so ever. Although the Zoo keepers claimed this was a “safe, fun place” (Zookeeper, Wellington Zoo) for the animals to be, I found this statement highly questionable. Thinking critically about the relationship between the visual text presented on the TV screen and the enclosure itself allowed me to recognize the irony and contrast between tigers in Zoo’s and tigers in their natural habitat and relate it to my own design practices. I have always been interested in searching for irony within design and dress.

Looking closely to find connections between an outside visual text and relating it to my own design practices and interests was something I found truly important within this process. I have gained a deeper understanding about context through readings. I agree critical thinking and close analysis of visual text are an extremely important part of art and design practices.

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237.130 Week 3: Task 3: Draft #2

The process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is extremely important to art and design practices. If an artist can not think critically about someone else’s work then they will struggle to offer in-depth meaning within their own work. Critical thinking involves being able to consider, understand and respond accordingly to several different aspects of thinking. These aspects include creative thinking, analyzing, problem-solving, reasoning and evaluating (Wallace, Schirato, Bright, Page: 46).

In reading How To See The World by Nicholas Mirzoeff , Mirzoeff offers great insight to our generation and the disregard we have for the natural world that surrounds us. “Aki Hoshide took his own picture in space. Ignoring the spectacle of Earth, space and moon” (Mirzoeff, Page:8) Mirzoeff compares this to the photograph known as Blue Marble taken in 1972. Blue Marble contains only the Earth and Hoshide’s image contains only himself with a slight reflection of the world and space around him due to his reflective helmet. Hoshide’s actions tell us a lot about the time that we live in. The fact that the astronaut turned the camera on himself whilst being faced with potentially the most astonishing sight anyone could experience speaks a lot about our generation’s values. We live in a world where the ‘selfie’ is everything. Understanding contrast between the two images and two moments in time helped me to gather a more complex understanding about how context can immensely affect art and design processes.

I experienced similar contrast and also immense irony whilst visiting Wellington Zoo’s tiger enclosure. I walked towards a glass and metal gated enclosure about the size of a rugby field. I was met with a large sculpture of a crouching tiger with a huge smile on his face. Walking further I found a wooden viewing area which contained a place to stand and view the tigers accompanied by a TV screen showing tigers in their natural habitat. The tigers in the cage were fast asleep inside a rock cave and I could only just see some stripes through the grass.They were not moving. The tigers on the TV screens were jumping around playing with each other making noises, they looked lively and happy. I found the contrast between the tigers on the TV screen and the tigers in the enclosures extremely ironic. The TV screen showed boundless movement and freedom and the enclosure in front of me offered no movement what so ever. Thinking critically about the relationship between the visual text presented on the TV and the enclosure allowed me to recognize the irony and contrast between tigers in Zoo’s and tigers in their natural habitat and relate it to my own design practices. I have always been interested in searching for irony within design and dress.

Looking closely to find how an outside visual text can relate to my own design practices and interests was something I found really important within this process. I have gained a deeper understanding about context through readings. I agree critical thinking and close analysis of visual text are an extremely important part of art and design practices.

 

237.130 Week 3: Task 3: Draft #1

INTRO:

The process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are extremely important to art and design practices. If an artist can not think critically about someone else’s work then they will struggle to offer in depth meaning within their own work. (introduce meaning of critical thinking)

CRITICAL THINKING:

Critical thinking includes creative thinking, analyzing, problem-solving, reasoning and evaluating. Being able to consider, understand and communicate all of these aspects is what critical thinking is all about.

Critical thinking affects everything we do from seeing, hearing and imagining to our thoughts about other people, the planet and the lives we live.

CONTEXT:

Without understanding context it is hard to put yourself in an artists shoes and figure out the “who, what, when, where and why” (Ruszkiewicz, Page 32) that surrounds any particular visual text.

QUOTE:

“In December 2012 the Japanese astronaut Aki Hoshide, took his own picture in space. Ignoring the spectacle of Earth, space and moon, Hoshide turned the camera on himself creating the ultimate ‘selfie’, or self taken portrait. Ironically any trace of his appearance or personality disappears in this image as his reflective visor shows only what he is looking at- The International Space Station and below it Earth.”

I find this quote from Mirzoeff really interesting. It tells us a lot about our generation and the lack of genuine interest we have for the earth and our surroundings.

FIELD TRIP:
There were lots of animals to look at, all in tiny, somewhat dirty cages or enclosures. Some enclosures were accompanied by a TV screen showing the animal in its natural habitat looking healthy and happy and a small speaker playing sounds that animal makes. The contrast between the animal on the screen and the animal in the cage made me question the well-being of the innocent creatures stuck inside the enclosures. (Explain which part of this was the visual text and how thinking critically gave me insight)

VISUAL TEXT EG:

The bold “HOW YOU CAN HELP” text draws the viewer in and when looking closer at the adorable animals pictured you feel compelled to help. All of the animals pictured look so innocent and happy. (Explain more in depth what thinking critically about this poster helped me understand)

CONCLUSION:

Within this project I have gained a lot of experience thinking critically about visual text. Going above and beyond face value and first impressions.

237.130 Week 3: Task 2: Critical Thinking – Wallace, Schirato, Bright

I found this text very complex but very interesting. It helped me gain a deeper understanding reading a text that wrote so critically about critical thinking. When the authors wrote about critical thinking being a broad term (Page: 46) and broke the different aspects off into seperate smaller categories it made it a lot easier to understand. Critical thinking includes creative thinking, analyzing, problem-solving, reasoning and evaluating. Being able to consider, understand and communicate all of these aspects is what critical thinking is all about.

The authors sound very authoritative throughout the entire text. I would describe their tone as dominating and at times imperious. The pronoun ‘You’ is used several times and this gives off the vibe that the authors know more than I did as the reader. This could be because they were constantly telling the reader what they did and didn’t do or know. I found it quite difficult to understand as the sentences were structured in a complex way and I didn’t know definitions of some of the words. I enjoyed reading this text after some dictionary use and feel the authors had an interesting and fresh way of looking at critical thinking.

237.130 Week 3: Task 1: Context

Context describes the situation, environment and time that any particular visual text was created. Without understanding the context it is hard to put yourself in an artist’s shoes and figure out the “who, what, when, where and why” (Ruszkiewicz, Page 32) that surrounds any particular visual text.  Critical thinking would become an incomplete process without understanding the meaning or narration of visual text.

237.130 Week 2: Task 4: Visual Text Analysis

This was a poster located in the hallway before you entered the adoption rooms at the Wellington SPCA. The bold “HOW YOU CAN HELP” text draws the viewer in and when looking closer at the adorable animals pictured you feel compelled to help. All of the animals pictured look so innocent and happy. Having the SPCA logo at the bottom of the poster lets the viewer know who they are supporting and adds to the authenticity of the statements written. The poster is well positioned. Viewers can read it as they enter or exit the animal visiting rooms. I feel this was aimed at older viewers who hadn’t adopted on the day as it states alternative ways of helping out. Below it are flyers for viewers to take home which contained extra information about the SPCA and how they could help.

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237.130 Week 2: Task 3: Comparing and Contrasting

On entering both the SPCA and the Wellington Zoo, we were met with several different animals all inside cages or enclosures. Although this was a huge similarity I found both places completely different experiences. I found the staff at the SPCA kind, gentle and passionate about their jobs. While at the Zoo we saw a Zookeeper sneak up behind two relaxed wallabies to stomp at them and give them a fright he then walked away laughing. This gave off the complete opposite vibe and made me angry knowing that he felt enjoyment out of scaring the innocent animals. Although the SPCA didn’t have the best resources or places to home the animals you could tell that they were all happy. Being encouraged to get them out and have a cuddle offered a much more intimate experience. At the Zoo, the majority of the animals were sleeping or being taunted by disrespectful people viewing them. You could see in their eyes that the Zoo animals were not genuinely happy as in a cage is not where they belong.